News

Vacancy: Marketing & Sales Admin Assistant

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Marketing and Sales Administrative Assistant
Part–time Post (21 hours/week) – across 3-5 days a week

(Contract for 12 months initially)

Basis Training are recruiting to an exciting new position to support a growing area of business. This post has been created to be a first point of contact for clients that purchase our resources, training and school sessions, arrange the related logistics and administration. Basis Training products are linked to the work of Basis Yorkshire and help extend the impact of this charity by improving the work by other professionals around the country while at the same time generating an income for the charity. This role will play a vital support role for the Business Development Manager, who is responsible for the sales and marketing of Basis Training products.

This position will work closely with the Business Development Manager to coordinate the administrative and sales tasks, (including booking processes, arranging logistics, travel, printing information packs), and the provision of management information to the generation of income and raising awareness by Basis Training.

You will be based in our office at 94 North Street (Leeds, LS2 7PN)

Basis is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and vulnerable adults. This post will be subject to a DBS check.

If you do need to speak to someone regarding your application you can contact the Basis office on 0113 2430036 and ask for Amber Wilson or alternatively e-mail: amber_wilson@basistraining.org.uk

Applications to: info-basis@basisyorkshire.org.uk

Closing date: 5th June 2017 5pm and interviews will be held on in the week of June 12th and will include a 15 minute delivery of an activity.

Basis is committed to quality, equality and valuing diversity. We welcome applicants from all sections of the community.

Because of the nature of the work this posts is open to women only.

Sex discrimination act 1975 exemption S7 (2) (e) applies.

Only applicants who have the right to work in the UK or have a valid visa or work permit for a minimum of 6 months at the time of application will be considered for this role.

Marketing and Sales Administration Assistant Application Form

Equal Opportunities Form

Person Specification Marketing and Sales Admin Assistant

Job Description Marketing and Sales Admin Assistant

Company Limited by Guarantee No. 8840099
Basis Yorkshire, 94 North Street, Leeds, LS2 7PN, 0113 243 0036

Safer Internet Day – 5 things NOT to do about online safety!

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Last week, the news emerged about a man who had sent an indecent image of him
self in a live chat to young person from a primary school in Leeds who had been using the app lively.  While shocking, this is unlikely to be a unique event. According to Internet Matters, by the age of 8, many children will have begun using a smart phone, according to Internet Matters, with social media and instant messaging being the most popular use. What’s unique is that this story just made it to the press.

That these dangers are real and can have more far reaching consequences is evident from the Breck Bednar case who was murdered by a man who groomed him while playing on his Xbox. This year, supporters of Breck Foundation set up in his memory will be raising funds by pledging one day of Cyber Silence throughout a 10-day period, starting on Safer Internet Day.  Being linked to the charity Basis Young People many young people do not get the information they need to understand what a healthy relationship. Without the right information they also are less likely to appreciate fully the risks of online contacts with what appear to be friends – it may be very exciting – all part of adolescence! Here’s 5 things we think you should NOT be doing to keep our young children safe online!

#1 DON’T DISPROPORTIONATELY RESTRICT ACCESS

The solution some say is to restrict access to any online activity. While I have my doubts about the feasibility of such restrictions nowadays, more importantly, by doing so young people are then also ostracized from any social networks and friends that they might engage with more positively as a support network. Indeed, the Breck Foundation also stresses the positive impact of the internet.  Taking access away also sends the signal that a young person should be punished rather than being someone that needs help as we’ve had young people tell us.  Dr. Emma Bond, associate professor at the University of Suffolk and author of Childhood , Mobile Technology and Everyday Experiences is quoted in a recent Sunday Time article as saying: “At the moment I’m doing workshops with young people in years5,6 and 7 and asking them “what do you wish someone had told you about the internet”? Many of the answers are the same: how to respond when someone says something nasty online. But many times they don’t tell anyone, because they think they will take their phone away, rather than give them the support they need”.

#2 DON’T STOP INFORMING YOUNG PEOPLE ABOUT THE RISKS

Having said that, restricting access at a younger age (younger primary age) is appropriate, even if not fully feasible, through enhanced privacy settings and restricting apps that are not able to provide such security as so many have private messaging functions. What’s more important however is that we talk to young people, find out what their concerns are, what their experiences online have been and give the information so they understand why privacy settings are so important. Most young people we talk to in our school’s workshops about online safety and the risks associated with it (including sexual exploitation) don’t recognise the risks or don’t know how to seek support or feel embarrassed or blame themselves.

#3 DON’T BLAME THE YOUNG PEOPLE

In our sessions about online safety for young people we always emphasize that whatever happens as a consequence, they are never at fault in the hope that will not be too ashamed or embarrassed to ask for help.

#4 DON’T BE AFRAID TO ASK YOUNG PEOPLE INFORMATION ABOUT THE LATEST APPS

We need to talk more to parents about the dangers and understanding the need to think beyond the usual suspects of Facebook and SnapChat , new apps come on all the time and often parents often  don’t fully appreciate the risks associated with them, feel overwhelmed or incapable of understanding the latest app. It doesn’t have to be an app – similar dangers exist with an Xbox.  However, the best people to tell you about the latest app are the young people – another good reason to keep talking to them! There are also ample resources online to find out more about the apps and the risks associated such as the NSPCC and Internet Matters.

#5 DON’T FORGET THE INTERNET IS A FORCE FOR BAD AND GOOD

By focusing on the negative aspects or risks of the internet, young people might either become even more curious and or more anxious about the risks. Through all the bad news  stories, its easy to for get about lots of positive ways to engage with the internet and the evidence shows that young people also recognise this with over 2.1 million young people engaging in a positive manner. Indeed, many children are able to access vital support online through the Childline online chat service.  This Internet Safety Day, for their own wellbeing, lets make sure we keep talking to our children about the internet, the bad AND the good!

Sexual Violence, consent and our take on Stanford

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Guilty of 3 counts of sexual assault yet only 6 months in county jail and probation – taking account the age (20) of the perpetrator, the lack of previous criminal convictions and the severe impact on his life led the judge to decide to his level of sentencing, causing outrage worldwide. The case of Brock Turner in Stanford (US) has led to worldwide discussions on sexual violence, the impact on the victim (and the perpetrator) and the issue of consent.

For those unaware of the case: 20 year old student Brock Turner was found guilty of 3 counts of sexual assault but, while facing a max. of 14 years in prison he got 6 months in county jail and probation, with the justification alleging to the fact that a longer sentence would have a “severe impact” on Turner, a champion swimmer. Brock’s father had called on the judge to grant probation, as a sentence would be a “steep price … for 20 minutes of action” as “his son’s life had been deeply altered forever”. He also referred his son’s actions as “non-violent” and related to “sexual promiscuity.“The victim found the courage to share her very detailed and graphic victim’s statement online which has raised substantial support for her case and resulted in outrage over the sentence – with an online petition reaching over 600,000 signatures, calling for the judge’s removal.

The leniency shown through the sentencing and the responses by Brock’s father show a dangerous  and worrying lack of understanding of the damage sexual violence can have on a person, with potentially lifelong consequences for both physical and mental health with further consequences for education, employment, family and social life. The reference to “20 minutes of action “ appears to imply that it was only during the 20 minutes that the victim may have suffered any damage and while able to highlight the lifelong impact on the perpetrator this does not seem to translate into any parallel impact on the victim. The substantial impact on the victim is clearly evident from her victim statement and are as expected based on evidence available from research on the topic. Its also clear that the concept of “informed consent” was not taken into consideration (“he thought I liked it because I rubbed his back)” – thankfully in this country CPS guidance states that if there is evidence that by reason of drink or drugs the victim was unaware of what was occurring and/or or incapable of giving valid consent (in this case the victim was unconscious due to intoxication) and the perpetrator cannot reasonably believe that consent was given, then someone can be charged with sexual assault.

Yes – the victim does not remember it happening to her as she was too intoxicated. This does not mitigate any of the harm this might have caused her and the mere fact that she doensn’t  remember might in fact it might exacerbate any harm caused?

Even if the victim migth have wanted to engage in anything sexual with the defendant, as the now infamous tea-cup clip shows –its fairly normal for someone to change their mind when asked about whether they want something and its good to check this before simply “giving” someone you think they wanted a while back, especially if they not be aware of what’s happening. Worryingly – what message does it send to women around the world?

Sexual assault is still an all too frequent occurrence in the UK: Figures from Rape Crisis UK show that 1 in 5 women aged 16 – 59 has experienced some form of sexual violence since the age of 16. Young people too are subjected to sexual harassment and violence, including worryingly in schools, leading to the government launching a parliamentary enquiry into the scale and impact of sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools based on evidence from pre-consultation work with over 300 young people shows sexting, online bullying and the normalisation of pornography are all issues for students and they want more support in dealing with them.

Causes of RapeLike Brock and his father, many people , young and old believe (or are made to believe), that the victim could have prevented this by dressing differently or not drinking as much – there are of course protective behaviours but this does not change the answer to the question who is at fault – as this could only be the perpetrator? If you leave your bag or car open, does that make it right for someone else to steal all its contents? You would still be convicted as a thief?

Already a key theme for Basis Yorkshire, in the coming months, Basis Training will be focusing more on this area of work, by working with young people on issues around consent, sexual harassment and violence (offline and online) and the impact of pornography, sex and relationships. We’ve also just re-launched our Sexual Violence training with some great feedback already from delegates who attended and we’ll be launching our Pornography and Young People’s training, using amongst others our latest Is it Normal Resource over the next few months.

Sexual Violence and Consent – our take on Stanford

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Guilty of 3 counts of sexual assault yet only 6 months in county jail and probation – taking account the age (20) of the perpetrator, the lack of previous criminal convictions and the severe impact on his life led the judge to decide to his level of sentencing, causing outrage worldwide. The case of Brock Turner in Stanford (US) has led to worldwide discussions on sexual violence, the impact on the victim (and the perpetrator) and the issue of consent.

For those unaware of the case: 20 year old student Brock Turner was found guilty of 3 counts of sexual assault but, while facing a max. of 14 years in prison he got 6 months in county jail and probation, with the justification alleging to the fact that a longer sentence would have a “severe impact” on Turner, a champion swimmer. Brock’s father had called on the judge to grant probation as a sentence would be a “steep price … for 20 minutes of action” as “his son’s life had been deeply altered forever”. The victim found the courage to share her very detailed and graphic victim’s statement online which has raised substantial support for her case and resulted in outrage over the sentence – with an online petition reaching over 600,000 signatures, calling for the judge’s removal.

The leniency shown through the sentencing and the responses by Brock’s father show a dangerous lack of understanding of the damage sexual violence can have on a person, with potentially lifelong consequences for both physical and mental health with further consequences for education, employment, family and social life. The reference to “20 minutes of action “ appears to imply that it was only during the 20 minutes that the victim may have suffered any damage and while able to highlight the lifelong impact on the perpetrator this does not seem to translate into any parallel impact on the victim. The substantial impact on the victim is clearly evident from her victim statement and are as expected based on evidence available from research on the topic. Its also clear that the concept of “informed consent” was not taken into consideration (“he thought I liked it because I rubbed his back)” – thankfully in this country CPS guidance now states that if there is evidence that by reason of drink or drugs the victim was unaware of what was occurring and/or or incapable of giving valid consent (in this case the victim was unconscious due to intoxication) and the perpetrator cannot reasonably believe that consent was given, then someone can be charged with sexual assault.

Yes – the victim does not remember it happening to her as she was too intoxicated. This does not mitigate any of the harm this might have caused her and in fact it might exacerbate any harm caused? As the now infamous tea-cup clip shows –its fairly normal for someone to change their mind when asked about whether they want something and its good to check this before simply “giving” someone you think they wanted a while back, especially if they not be aware of what’s happening. Worryingly – what message does it send to women around the world?

Sexual assault is still an all too frequent occurrence in the UK: Figures from Rape Crisis UK show that 1 in 5 women aged 16 – 59 has experienced some form of sexual violence since the age of 16. Young people too are subjected to sexual harassment and violence, including worryingly in schools, leading to the government launching a parliamentary enquiry into the scale and impact of sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools based on evidence from pre-consultation work with over 300 young people shows sexting, online bullying and the normalisation of pornography are all issues for students and they want more support in dealing with them.

Like Brock and his father, many people , young anCauses of Raped old believe (or are made to believe) that the victim or that he/she could have prevented this by dressing differently or not drinking as much – there are of course protective behaviours but this does not change the answer to the question who is at fault – as this could only be the perpetrator? If you leave your bag or car open, does that make it right for someone else to steal all its contents?

Already a key theme for Basis Yorkshire, in the coming months, Basis Training will be focusing more on this area of work, by working with young people on issues around consent, sexual harassment and violence (offline and online) and the impact of pornography, sex and relationships. We’ve also just re-launched our Sexual Violence training with some great feedback already from delegates who attended and will be launching a Pornography and Young People’s training, using amongst others our latest Is it Normal Resource over the next few months.

Basis Training at the NWG CSE Conference

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The NWG Child Sexual Exploitation conference took place last month and Basis Training was scheduled to present a workshop on the impact of pornography on young people. We were not alone it seems  – the topic of pornography and young people featured in 3 other workshops over the course of the three days. Its great to see so much attention is given to this important topic.

Is it Normal?

At Basis Training we have been talking a lot about this topic recently and with the input of a group of young people developed a resource to engage young people on this topic called Is it Normal. The conference saw a lot of statistics on the extent of young people accessing sexualised images, what type, what age etc. etc.  and its clear that there is some quite explicit material being viewed by a significant amount of young people. What was not always made clear though was that statistics vary greatly, including on things like frequency of access or first age of viewing and research on this topic is problematic for all kinds of reasons as set out recently in the report “Identifying the Routes by which Children View Pornography Online: Implications for Future Policy-makers Seeking to Limit Viewing.

What do we and don’t we know?

We know that young people access pornography for all sorts of different reasons and often access is more accidental than deliberate. What appears to be less clear and indeed contradictory is the effect of pornography on young people although emerging evidence appears to suggest that it is affecting the expectations of young people about sexual relations. Although some links appear to exist, a causal relationship between viewing pornography and risk taking behaviour is less clear as is the case for the way young people are affected by violent and sexualised imagery and whether the effect is long-lasting. Regardless of the above, we know from our own work with young people experiencing child sexual exploitation that pornography can be used to  desensitize young people  to extremely violent sexualised experiences. We’ve also heard harrowing accounts first hand from young people we have worked with of the effect of viewing pornography. We we must therefore make sure that young people are protected from such potential harm. While at the same time, as can also be seen clearly in our resource Is it Normal – some people are not really affected by it and take it for the fiction that it is.

We need to talk to young people about it!

Is it Normal DVDWhat did come through loud and clear from the young people we worked with and many of the workshops visited was the value in talking about this topic with young people – to ensure that what they are viewing is balanced out with a counter narrative.   By focusing too much on the negative or not discussing it all, it remains secretive and hidden, young people can’t access support and may no longer consider the positives of happy, fulfilling consensual relationships. Given the likelihood of their exposure to it, however many filters we try to install, and the potential harm it might cause, especially if the topic remains taboo or simply something to boast, laugh about or scare or threaten your friends with in school, its too important a topic to ignore. By discussing Porn, Sex and Relationships openly we can equip young people with the knowledge and skills that enables them to recognise it for what it is. Our website now has more  info on our own and other resources for more information on this topic. Keep your eye out for more news on this as we develop our own young people’s workshops and training for professionals about it as well.

 

Child Sexual Exploitation – its not your fault!

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CSE Day 2016 – its not your fault!

Child sexual exploitation (CSE) can have lifelong consequences.  Moreover, many of the girls and young women we work already have additional vulnerabilities in their lives which can already leave lifelong damage: 23% had recognised mental health issues, 42% were involved in substance abuse, 52% had experienced domestic  abuse in their home and 21% were involved in offending. The longer CSE goes unnoticed, the greater the likelihood of substantial impact on young people’s lives.

That’s why its so great to see so many organisations taking part in the  National CSE Awareness Day, set up by the National Working Group – from the police, to local authorities and LSCBs and lots of other local voluntary sector organisations through community awareness to publicity campaigns, the creation of resources to social media awareness throughout the week and on the day itself.

This year, we decided to let young people have their voices heard in the campaign #helpinghands   -and sharing those throughout the day.  We currently support 10 – 12 young women at risk of or experiencing CSE and we support over 50 young people a year, with over 94 % reducing their risk to low in the past year.

We asked them what they would say to Picture2 (2)other young people to prevent them experiencing the same things they have, to other young people already experiencing CSE and to practitioners and other adult supporting young people like them and the results were impressive – many focused on the theme of “blame and judgement” (“its not my fault” ,“don’t judge”, “don’t punish”) .This theme was alPicture3so loud and clear when we did a workshop with young women in Year 8 about CSE and asked them for similar messages.
These were young women that had taken part in a CSE Awareness raising session a few months ago and it was great to see so much of our session had been retained. “Its not your fault” is so important to share – its key in ensuring a young person seeks help, as many still are afraid or embarrassed to do so: NSPCC research from 2014 shows that young people suffering contact sexual abuse are not sharing this with anyone in particular when this is abuse by a friend (in 34% of cases of abuse by adults and in 82% of abuse by peers they did not tell anyone).

Recogising young people are not to blame is also key for their self-esteem during and following specialist support services like Basis YP . It also key in making sure professionals acknowledge the need for support rather than responding “you shouldn’t have…” and “why did you” as sadly we still see happening today by young people, professionals and  society alike.

The increased focus by the media on the issue is great and has helped raise awareness of CSE in general but also helps challenge stereotypes such as “it only happens to girls” – through the media focus on the sad story of Breck Bednar. Sadly the media focus in not always helpful– as some media stories get more coverage than others, there is a perception that CSE is limited to those cases that appear on the front page – such as Rotherham. However, as Adele Gladman, one of our trainers at Basis and lead professional that helped bring the Rotherham cases to light said last week at  the “Coming out of the Darkness”  conference – “its not just Rotherham, cases like these are still not coming to light across the country”. This unbalanced reporting ensures stereotypes about the background, gender, ethnicity and location of victims and perpetrators are reinforced.

Over the past 2 years we’ve trained over 800 professionals in Leeds and across the country on a range of aspects relating to CSE: understanding grooming models, risk assessments and perpetrators to dealing with the practical challenges and supporting victims through court and raised awareness of CSE with over 3000 young people in Leeds. This work is vital to ensuring more young people are prevented from becoming involved, recognising the signs if its happening to them or their friends and if they do become involved, have well trained professionals at hand to support them. We need more than that though  – society as a whole needs to understand and recognise child sexual exploitation as its everyone’s responsibility – why don’t you make your own pledge today to #ENDCSE #Helping Hands?

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Safer Internet Day – why we all have our part to play

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Isn’t it great to see a positive campaign on online safety – highlighting the potential as well as the risks and setting the scene on how if everyone plays their part we can make the most of it if we can mitigate the risks for young people (and adults!) – its such a force for good and a great source to make friendships, raise funds, help others, stay in touch and learn about the world and how to do things – there’s a YouTube tutorial on anything you can think of.

Basis Training does a lot of preventative workshops in school on online safety and in that guise we make pupils aware of the risks of being online – in the full knowledge that we can’t stop children and young people going online and nor should we try to. The risks are undeniably there: being bullied, being exposed to inappropriate sexualised content being groomed, or some with the most tragic consequences – in particular when online contact leads to contact or has other consequences in real life.

So what do we do about this? Stopping children and young people accessing the internet isn’t the solution either – although filters have their place for ensuring young children don’t access inappropriate content, such as highly sexualised content and/or extreme violence but these are not perfect and children are clever and curious about things – especially about things they are not meant to know about.

Children at a very young age are advanced users of tablets and smartphones. According to Ofcom, 34% of children aged between 5 and 15 now have their own tablet. This is topical with a team member at one of our supporters – SEO Agency Spike Digital, as their Digital Strategist (and father of 3) Duncan Colman explains: “We want our children to embrace technology in moderation and protect them from adult content, which is a message that takes time to convey to a 5-6 year old. We are taking the plunge and buying our kids Amazon Fire Kids Editions to prevent them from accessing things they could find really harmful. This includes YouTube content, browser content and social media access – the latter of which we’ll address when they are at that age!”

A lot of parents say they sign up as a friend on their child’s Facebook account or their email account as a safety measure which is positive in terms of recognising the risk and engaging in conversation although gives a false sense of security. Adjusting privacy settings is equally very important – although those that want to cause harm are usually extremely good at manipulating children and adults and finding ways to reach out to them – and its very easy to take conversations offline through other apps or other Facebook accounts where they are not accessible anymore – and more to the point – parents or teachers or other professionals can’t spend their time monitoring their internet activity all the time! Just as we don’t keep our children indoors or follow them around all the time, we can’t keep them offline either.

So- what then? Talk, Educate and Train!
Talk: to young people- as adults, parents, carers, teachers, social workers –  or as a young person to your friend – whether its about the risks of sharing pictures online, of meeting people in real life that you’ve only met online, who to go to when you are being bullied or whether its about understanding why you might be uncomfortable watching pornography and that it might affect your relationship.

Educate – There are some great educational resources out there already – including some created by the Safer Internet Day campaign, CEOP and many others including our own resource Is it Normal (engaging young people to talk about accessing pornography).

Train – Talking and educating doesn’t mean the risks will go away completely – even a teacher, parent or friend with the best, open, loving relationship with a young person may not be able to prevent them becoming a victim of online manipulation – however we can learn to spot the signs and know where to get help. As professionals we need to make sure that staff at every level have the best possible training and support to recognise the signs and provide professional support when a young person, parent or fellow professional raises concerns about a young person. So – lets keep talking, educating and training so that children and young people can see and use the internet for all its wonderful potential and all play our part in keeping it safe.

Dec News- New dates, discounts & locations for CSE Training

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Our December newsletter is out with info on new dates,  discounts and locations for our latest CSE Training Courses, new courses coming up and our resources.

Our next Level 2 course (CSE Victims Voice Jan 21st) is now at a 20% discount!

Our Level 3 Supporting CSE Victims in Court which will be in London! Further info and to book please see CSE Training Open Courses on our website or contact us. 

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Encouraging words and support from the West Yorkshire Police and Crime Commissioner Mark Burns – Williamson for the work of Basis Yorkshire (formerly Genesis Leeds), Basis Training and the Blast Project on our work in supporting young people at risk of or experiencing child sexual exploitation – as featured at our CSE event on September 14th!

New CSE Level 3 Open Training Course: Supporting Child Sexual Exploitation Victims in Court

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This course shares the experiences of this to date and what lessons can be learned from these to get it right for children? Our specialist trainer Adele Gladman, with frontline experience of supporting victims through such processes has designed a high quality course to inform those attending of common poor experiences that young people have, how to avoid them, and how to minimise what can be a traumatic experience for many young people. It will look at the roles of individual services, and best practice within a multi agency framework. The course is Level 3 CPD certified. Book here now!

Our new DVD Resource “Is it Normal”

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As an organisation that works with young people in schools and through the frontline work of Basis Yorkshire (formerly Genesis Leeds) we often hear about the impact of sexualised images on young people and the difficulties teachers and other professionals face with discussing this. As explained by our trainer Taylor in this clip, we know that a first experience of watching sexualised images online can have a negative impact on young people (women and men)  and that it is used as part of the grooming process  to normalise extreme sexual behaviour. We have therefore developed a DVD and Resource Pack to facilitate discussions on this topic with young people by professionals, teachers, parents etc which we hope to launch by the end of April but for now, here’s a taster and keep an eye on our newsletter and website for news on the launch in the next few months or contact us if you wish to be informed directly.

Who are you really talking to?

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Basis Training and Education are pleased to support the latest online safety campaign from Leeds LSCB and West Yorkshire Police. We know from our work in schools that almost all child sexual exploitation (CSE) and grooming cases nowadays have an online element and online safety is therefore paramount. The new campaign aimed at young people aims to raise awareness of who young people are talking to online and has information and casestudies on online safety and sexting. Additionally there is plenty of information on local and national agencies that can help if you’re worried about this issue. Check out the great new site here 

#thebrief

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Basis Training and Education is excited to promote #thebrief.

#thebrief is a living document sharing information and updates on all things social media! This free resource is aimed at professionals and parents to demystify the difference between a hashtag and a status update. #thebrief has been created after research at a Leeds based secondary school highlighted the huge gulf of knowledge regarding social media and internet use between young people and professionals.

#thebrief is an evolving resource written currently by professionals. With new ideas in the pipeline #thebrief is looking at new ways to reach out to professionals and parents who want to take a proactive approach to understanding how young people interact online.

Take a look below for the latest documents, download, print off and stick around your place of work. The greater reach these updates have, the better! Enjoy. Learn more here

If you would like to be added to the mailing list please email natalie.lovett@westyorkshire.pnn.police.uk

Tour de Yorkshire – doing something good!

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In  a few days time the Grand Depart will begin from right outside the Basis offices on July 5th. From our office window we can see the preparations begin. We want to acknowledge our Yorkshire and Leeds heritage and celebrate our roots by doing something positive out of this special time! We’re offering all customers 10% off our in-house training if booked before the end of August. You can select any training dates before end of December 2014! For more information contact Charlotte here 

North Yorkshire LSCB and City of York LSCB

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Online Child Sexual Exploitation Survey

Dear Colleagues,

Please click on the link here to complete the Child Sexual Exploitation online survey. The survey should take no longer than 15 minutes to complete. Your views and opinions will help shape the future of Child Sexual Exploitation services within your workforce. Thank-you for completing. Any questions please use the contact form on this website found here to contact me.

Thank-you,

Charlotte- Research Author, Basis.

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Check out our videos on Youtube!

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Basis Training and Education has a Youtube channel, its early days and we’re tweaking and refining it as we go along. The purpose of this channel is to share with you some short videos about our organisation and our work so you; our viewers get to learn a little bit more about us in a relaxed and informal way. Keep your eyes peeled for new videos coming soon. Check out our videos here 

Child Sexual Exploitation training in London

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Basis Training and Education are really excited to announce that we’ll be bringing our Level 2 and Level 3 Child Sexual Exploitation training courses to London on May 29th and 30th 2014. Basis Training and Education are really excited to announce that we’ll be bringing our Level 2 and Level 3 Child Sexual Exploitation training courses to London on May 29th and 30th 2014. London is a new area for Basis, we’ve worked with organisations across London who have commissioned our Child Sexual Exploitation training such as; Youth Access and Pride Fostering and we’re really excited about opening our new courses in this area. For further information click here.

Impact Reports

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Are you measuring Impact?

Its key when commissioning training that your organisation gets a clear understanding of ‘Impact.’ What Impact did that training have on; the team, knowledge, action planning and the future?

Here at Basis we provide comprehensive Impact Reports giving you the real picture of how your organisation plans to move forward.Great for measuring distance travelled.

Impact Reports can include; Statistics, Quotes, Pie Charts, Recommendations, Feedback. Each Report is tailor made and can be produced within 5 working days, or sooner if required.

If you didn’t opt for a package that includes an Impact Report, upgrade today for just £35.00.

New open course dates | 15% off

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Spring Offers

With Spring around the corner Basis Training are delighted to offer our customers 15% off our current training dates! And to add to that this year we’re branching out into London so our southern friends don’t have to travel quite as far to receive high quality, accredited Child Sexual Exploitation training.

We have Level 2, Level 3 and **New** Refresher dates all lined up from May until June to keep your knowledge up to date before the summer holidays begin. Refresher training lets you keep up to date on the latest Child Sexual Exploitation in just a 3 hour morning course.

Check out our course calender here to find out more about our training dates and special offers! 

Or drop me an email and I’ll send you our calender through!

Thanks, Charlotte

Level 3 course is now CPD certified

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Basis is pleased to announce that our Level 3: Exploring the practical challenges of working with victims of Child Sexual Exploitation is now CPD certified and accredited by the independent CPD service. This highlights Basis’s commitment to producing high quality training courses.

To receive our course directory and customer testimonials get in touch today

Level 3 Child Sexual Exploitation – open course

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Delegates attended our open course at SHINE Business Centre in Harehills on March 5th 2014. Our Trainer; Taylor Austin Little welcomed delegates bright and early at 9.30am with tea and coffee and a selection of biscuits to get the energy levels up! Delegates were impressed by the ample free car parking and bright, sunny and professional training venue.

Victim and Perpetrator

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Perpetrators and Victims 

The case of Amanda Spencer, 22, Sheffield is being widely reporting in the media as she is accused of luring girls into a life of ‘prostitution.’ 
Amanda denies almost 40 charges against her relating to Child Prostitution (legal term) between 2006 and 2011. Amanda is accused of grooming young girls when she herself was a teenager and facilitating child sexual offences.

Tackling Child Sexual Exploitation -Beyond Awareness

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The Basis training team were delighted to speak last week at the Safeguarding Children e-Academy conference – Beyond Awareness.

Our trainer Taylor Austin Little spoke about changing grooming models including; party lifestyle and peer on peer grooming.

We met with many Child Sexual Exploitation professionals who gave fascinating talks about their work including Zoe Lodrick and The Blast Project.

The Safeguarding Academy put on a useful, timely and relevant conference for professionals across the UK.

15 % off Level 3 Advanced CSE training | March 5th 2014

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Come and join the Basis training team and colleagues from across the UK at our Level 3 Advanced: Exploring the practical challenges of Child Sexual Exploitation training day. This one day course is aimed at professionals who have a good understanding of Child Exploitation but want to learn more about specialist support, tools and techniques from highly trained CSE front-line workers and Child Sexual Exploitation training experts.

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Festive thank-you to all our customers in 2013

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Basis Training and Education would like to say a huge thank-you to all our customers that trained with us or brought our Sick Party DVD Resource in 2013. Its been a fantastic year and our training courses have taken us all over the UK from London to Peterborough, Leeds to Luton. We’ve worked with a range of different organisations from; Private Foster Care Homes to Universities and Local Authorities. Encouragingly, 100% of delegates would recommend Basis Training to a colleague in 2013 which highlights our commitment to high quality training and care.Basis has now delivered our CPD certified training nationally to over 3000 professionals and we aim to get to even more of you in 2014. Basis is part of a network of charitable projects, all the money raised through our training is reinvested back into our intensive service delivery supporting victims of Child Sexual Exploitation. 

Rosie Campbell collects her OBE

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Rosie Campbell joined Genesis, Isis and Basis as our new CEO in September and today she’s been at St James Palace collecting her OBE in the 2013 Queens Birthday Honours list. Rosie’s OBE is in recognition of her services to vulnerable women. Congratulations Rosie!